Leading in “The Year of the Dog”

Leading in “The Year of the Dog”

Feb 16, 2018 begins the Chinese Year of the Dog.  Dogs are loyal, generous, and protective.  Given all of unrest in the world right now and the lack of civil discourse in the US and other places, what does the Year of the Dog call us to do as leaders?

Remember that dogs are loyal creatures, and generous to boot.  If you are a dog owner, you know the joy of being welcomed home from a hard day’s work by a dog happy to see you, no matter what mood you are in.  And if you make a mistake and/or leave it too long, it readily forgives you and is just happy to be with you.   At the same time, according to Chinese astrology, one of the weaknesses of the dog is that it trusts too easily and as a result, its judgment can be compromised.  This correlates with stories of people who have abused their dogs and the dogs are still amazingly loyal and protective of them.

So perhaps this year calls us to be loyal, generous and protective – but of what?  Is it a person? Or an ideal?  Confucius’ teachings on the importance of education, nobility, and ritual would suggest that we need to be loyal to the basic values that frame society and that enhance our humanity.  And that means being vocal and courageous in challenging those who would do otherwise.   As Confucius said:

In the presence of sages, you can see how to perfect your thoughts. In the presence of fools, you must awaken yourself. (The Analects of Confucius: 4.17)

--Cathy
Catherine M. (Cathy) Perme is the owner of C. M. Perme & Associates, LLC.

Cathy is a change agent with deep experience, offering practical wisdom to help you take the lead, team up, act with courage and find balance along the way. Her first full-length book is available on Amazon and entitled: Confucius in my Cubicle: Practical Wisdom for the Leader in All of Us.

Working for a Leader I Trust

Working for a Leader I Trust

As a consultant, my name is impacted by the leaders with whom I work. That’s because as a consultant I have no power to act. I do have influence based on my knowledge and skills, and the point of hiring someone like me, who is outside of the organization, is to get an external perspective or guidance on a situation. That said, it is up to the leader to decide what to do with any of the advice I provide.

As a result, I want to work with a leader that:

  • Has good intentions – that is, wants to make his/her organization or team better, not just improve his or her own position.
  • Is open to being influenced – not just by me, but by others who may have been trying to communicate concerns but have not been able to be heard
  • Is willing to examine his/her own behavior and is willing to change if that would help the situation – i.e. he/she does not stubbornly insist that it is others that have to change
  • Is willing to take the time to do something right – not assume that a single meeting/retreat will produce change
  • Will commit the time and energy to communicate and execute well on any plans that are developed.

This would be a leader that I could trust — trust to do what is right by his/her people and the organization, make the tough decisions, be professional, and own the process. This is the leader that will succeed. And that is the kind of leader with whom I want my name attached.

So, pardon me if I ask a lot of questions upfront. Because I want to make sure that YOU are the leader that I want to support!

--Cathy
Catherine M. (Cathy) Perme is the owner of C. M. Perme & Associates, LLC.

Cathy is a change agent with deep experience, offering practical wisdom to help you take the lead, team up, act with courage and find balance along the way. Her first full-length book is available on Amazon and entitled: Confucius in my Cubicle: Practical Wisdom for the Leader in All of Us.